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You are here:  HOME > Indian Subcontinent > Picture Gallery >

Thumbnail Pictures of Mahendranagar Border to Pokhara, Terai, Nepal

(October-April, 2010)

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Mahendranagar Border to Pokhara, Terai, Nepal

(October-November, 2010)

These Nepali kids all wanted their picture taken with my touring bike. I tried setting up my camera timer so I could get in the picture too, but they didn't understand what I was up to.  The bicycle is more exciting anyway. 

Silly me, I thought the major road on the map was paved and had a bridge over the river.  A nearly naked holy Hindu man walked up to me and (in excellent English) said he was expecting me and organized a group of religious pilgrims to carefully carry each bag across.  I half expected to see him walk on the water.  He refused to let me pay him and gave me a Hindu blessing instead.  What a place Nepal is. 

These ladies are fixing lunch for me and a bunch of army boys with assault rifles in hand - after getting arrested in China, I avoid taking pictures of soldiers but I love pictures of Hindu ladies in their colorful dresses.


Typical house of poor farmers in this area. Money can't buy happiness but poverty can't buy anything.

 


Bardia National Park and Tharu Cultural Museum, Nepal

(October, 2010)


My guide assured me the tiger did not see us but probably saw a fish.  This is still the best picture I will ever take.  He told me that tigers are good at fishing which was surprising to me.  I know a few house cats at my sister's house that would like to learn his technique. 

Bardia National Park - very unspoiled, full of elephants, rhinos and tigers.


My guide climbed a tree to look for animals.


My guide and I were heading back to camp on my last visit inside Bordia National Park, Nepal when we suddenly saw this rhino and very small baby through a clearing in the river reeds.  We were very close.  My guide told me "Mr. Tim, take snap (picture) and then we will climb a tree.  Rhino with baby is very dangerous" He was visibly scared.  The first picture I took was fuzzy but the sound of the camera caused baby's ears to go up and mother turned around.  I clicked this second picture and we went up the tree but they went the other direction.  This experience really put in perspective our place in the wild kingdom.

A friendly tiger with some words of advice. Anyone know what he's saying?


I'm not sure what kind of deer this is. It's the size of a horse and a little grumpy. He hung around the visitor center looking for handouts.

 


Tharu Cultural Museum at Bardia National Park, Nepal

(October, 2010)


An example of a Tharu household. While the museum does have some ancient artifacts, most of the devices shown here are still used daily in Tharu villages. In traditional homes, food preparation and eating all takes place in the same room, around the wood-fuel mud stove called a chulha. They are still commonly used in both mountain and plain societies.


The doli and chandol are carriages for the bride and groom. Made of bamboo, rope and muslin cloth, each is carried by four men.

Although Thula men have switched to more modern clothing, it's not unusual to see more traditional costumes on women and on special occasions.

Imagine trying to keep these shoes on your feet.

Some baskets are much more decorative, used for weddings or personal effects. Snail shells are boiled and woven into the sides of the basket.

 


Lumbini, Nepal: The birthplace of Buddha

(November, 2010)


The Maya Devi Temple. It marks the site where Princess Maya Devi gave birth to Siddartha Gautama, the historical Buddha.

The stones where Buddha was born under the auspicious Bodhi tree. The brochure says it was "renowned for its beauty of shady grove with lush green trees and colorful flowers."

The exact rock where baby Buddha landed. It wasn't really green.

Foundations from old stupas. This spot has been a center of worship for centuries.


A big tree covered with the prayer flags and offerings from pilgrims.

 


Buddhist Monasteries from different  Nations, Lumbini, Nepal

(November, 2010)

Royal Thai Buddhist Monastery

World Peace Pagoda, built by Japan

Great Drigung Kagyud Lotus Stupa


Gautami Num's Temple. Built by the Nepal Buddhists, it's the only monastery in the compound built for female worshippers. Someone should tell those guys.


Pokhara, Nepal

(November 2010 to February 2011)


View from the roof of my hotel in Pokhara.. These snow capped mountains remind me of the San Francisco Peaks in Flagstaff, Arizona, where I went to grad school. 

Wooden doongas for rent at Phewa Tal Lake.


View of the Lake Side bicycle path in Pokhara, taken from the International Peace Pagoda.


The road to the Peace Pagoda is ridiculously steep and exhausting on a touring bike but  the view was great.  Pokhara, Nepal

 


Kathmandu, Nepal

(February - April, 2011)

Crowded Thamel: tacky tourist zone in polluted Katmandu, Nepal.  Looks like some Korean tourists are causing a traffic jam while they haggle with a taxi driver but it gave me some space to take this shot. 

Posing with some friendly Nepali children during a walk in the industrial part of Kathmandu, Nepal 

Ladies selling marigolds outside the Temple in Durbar Square, Kathmandu.

Colorful wares for sale.


A peaceful spot down a quiet alley.


Making offerings.


Durbar Square, Kathmandu, Nepal

(April, 2011)


 Durbar Square is a complex of beautiful temples and shrines, both Hindu and Buddhist.

Always crowded with tourists and pilgrims, Durbar Square is the place to sit and watch Nepali life go by.

Built between the 12th and 18th centuries, Durbar Square was the King's residence until early 20th century.

Making green leaf plates.  For food or offerings, I'm not sure.

 


At the Baba House, Kathmandu, Nepal

(April, 2011)

A baba is a wondering holy man.

Women can be Babas too.

Near the temple, the Babas stay at the Baba house. Some friends of mine told me to visit and it was one of the most interesting things I did in Kathmandu.

The Baba house prepares piles of food everyday. I am told it is paid for by the government.


Firewood for the funeral fires at Pashupatinath temple.


Two of the Babas I met. These guys are just as happy and friendly as they look.

 


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