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The story of how I saved money, quit my job, sold my possessions, and set off to endlessly travel by bike around the world. My Plan

My 3 Books
I write, self publish and sell books about touring

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Places I have been
(
How can I afford this?)

India and Neighbors
May 2010 to present

Alaska / Canada / USA
May 2008 to April 2010

New Zealand
Sept 2007 to May 2008

Australia
Sept 2006 to Sept 2007

SE Asia / China
Nov 2004 to Sept 2006

South America
June 2003 to June 2004

AZ, Mexico, and Central America
March 2002 to April 2003

How I started
The 5 years before I left


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 Written on the road as I travel around the world on my bicycle


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Equipment Pages Index

Introduction
How Much to Bring and Weight
Some Advice About Advice
A Note to Perspective Sponsors and Gear Suppliers
(See more about Sponsorship)

START HERE for Touring Bikes and Commuting Bicycles
Custom Touring Bicycles and Bike Upgrade Buyers Guide
Bicycle Touring Frames 
The Steel Repair Myth.
Steel and Aluminum Derailleur Hanger Repair.
Bicycle Touring Wheels
Phil Wood: The Best Bicycle Hubs

Panniers / Bike Bags
Cargo Trailers Vs Panniers
Tires for Bike Tours..
Bicycle Touring Saddles.
Women's Specific Bike Touring Saddles
Brooks Leather Touring Bicycle Saddle Care and Conditioning
Bike Computer
Touring Handlebars, Bar Ends, Adjustable Stems, and Padded Grips.
Kickstands
Sealed Cartridge Headsets

How to prevent flat tires
Bike Route Trails and Maps

Camping
Buying Camping Equipment
Tent and Ground Cloth
Sleeping Bag
Sleeping Pad
Camp Stove
Pots and Pans
Water Filter
First Aide Kits
Solar Power for Camp

Clothing
Bike Touring Shorts

Electrical
Short-wave Radio
Computer
Internet
mp3
Bicycle touring lights

Books
Packing list
Pictures of Equipment Failures
Shopping


See My Videos Here



(see all 3 book)

Best Camping, Bicycle Touring, and Backpacking Stoves that burn Multi Fuels including White Gas, Gasoline and Petrol
See all stoves for international travel and cook sets and utensils

DSC00212.JPG (572711 bytes)
Buying gasoline for the camping stove. in Mexico

Making dinner while free camping in Bolivia

I use a camp stove almost every day, both for wilderness camping and my morning coffee. Sometimes it's the only option for a hot meal and other times it's a fantastic way to save money. I love cooking over an open fire, but that's not always feasible or practical.

There are several types of camp stoves.  I only have experience with the canister fuel and liquid fuel types.

The canister fuel type is very easy to light and works well at high altitudes.  My beef with the canister stove is that the canisters are hard (sometimes impossible) to find in developing countries and they do not last long.  Once a canister is empty, it gets thrown away.  This adds to the trail of trash behind you.

The liquid fuel stoves usually burn anything combustible like gasoline, kerosene, and white gas.  My stove is the liquid fuel type that burns several types of liquid fuel.  I use the same roads as motor vehicles so I'm always around gasoline stations.  Gasoline is the easiest and cheapest option.  Gasoline burns quick but leaves behind a lot of dirty black ash.  I prefer white gas because it burns the cleanest and gums up the stove the least but it's difficult to find outside of developed countries.  White gas is mandatory when riding over 3,000 meters (10,000 feet)  because of the lack of air.  I burn about half a liter to a liter of fuel a week.  When I'm in the market for a camp stove, there a few things that I look for.

See more pages  Stealth Camping  -  The Frugal Bike Tour

 

Things that I look for when buying a Camp Stove

- Ability to burn gasoline.  Gasoline is a universal evil in this world.  It is available in every country on earth.  Although I prefer to use a cleaner fuel, such as white gas, if I'm in a very poor country there will always be gasoline available.

- A large fuel bottle.  I like to have a liter bottle so I'm not always refueling.

Accessories that I like

- Repair kit.  A must for a gasoline (petrol) stove. Don't lose the printed directions, as you'll need them when the stove craps out.

- Wind shield / block.  This is a long foldable aluminum rectangle that surrounds the stove and blocks out the wind.  Most camping stoves come with one. 


 

MSR DragonFly Backpacking Stove

Click to Purchase MSR DragonFly Backpacking Stove

See all stoves for international travel
and cook sets and utensils

For the international gourmet, this multi-fuel stove has the most adjustable flame of any liquid fuel burning stove. New self-purging pump won't leak when you remove it from the stove after cooking, is easier to adjust and is more durable with better threads. Two control valves: one to regulate gas flow and another to dial-in a precise flame. Burns almost any fuel, including white gas, kerosene, diesel, automotive gas, aviation gas, stoddard solvent and naphtha. Field-maintainable stove stays clog-free thanks to its self-cleaning jet. Legs spring open for ease of use and fold compactly for storage--fits inside MSR cook sets, sold separately. Comes with windscreen, heat reflector, fuel pump and stuff sack. Requires MSR Fuel Bottle for operation, sold separately.

Click to Purchase MSR DragonFly Backpacking Stove


 

MSR Camp Stove Fuel Bottle - all sizes

Click to Purchase MSR Camp Stove Fuel Bottle - all sizes

With 3 different sizes, this aluminum bottle stores and transports your fuel and is compatible with all MSR liquid-fuel stoves including the DragonFly.

* Connects to the threaded pump of your MSR stove for use as a fuel tank
* Airtight seal allows fuel to be stored longer by preventing air from entering and degrading fuel
* Child-resistant packaging (CRP) cap makes it difficult for kids to open the bottle
* Made from single-piece, impact-extruded aluminum to prevent leaks and cracks
* Bolstered shoulder and base resist bulging when pressurized

11 fl. oz. size fuel bottle is great for weekend trips our when bicycle touring light and hitting the gasoline stations every couple days.

20 fl. oz. size fuel bottle is good for long weekend backpacking trips or cycle touring.

30 fl. oz. size fuel bottle  is expedition ready for 5 - 7 day backcountry trips where refueling is not an option or long bike touring trips where you are camping every night, use the stove a lot, and do not like to bother with gas stations often.

If you can not decide you may want to buy the biggest and smallest size and be ready for all adventures.

Click to Purchase MSR Camp Stove Fuel Bottle - all sizes


 

MSR DragonFly Camp Stove Expedition Service Kit

Click to purchase. Stove Maintenance Kits

Keep your DragonFly™ breathing fire with this comprehensive maintenance and spare-parts kit intended for extreme or extended trips. Includes the necessary tools and most commonly needed replacement parts for the DragonFly stove and pump. Packaged in durable carrying case.

Click to Purchase Stove Maintenance Kits


 

 

 

 

eXTReMe Tracker

Bicycle Touring
Tips & Advice 
(see all Equipment Pages)

Touring Bicycles
Panniers
Racks
Saddles
Tires
Lights

Fenders
Tools and Spares

Tents
Sleeping Bags
Camping Mattress
Camp Stove
Water Filter
Pots and Pans
First Aide Kits
Solar Power for Camp

Bike Maps
Preventing Flat Tires

Bike Computer
Cargo Trailers
Kick Stands
Pedals
Handelbars/Grips
Headsets

Helmet
Bike Shoes
Bike Touring Shorts

Much MORE Gear Here!

Sponsors (how?)


Cycle Touring Racks

Tents and ground cloths
Sleeping Bags
Camping Mattress Pads


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